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Lama Marut's Video

Short, downloadable video taken from Lama Marut's teachings in the USA and abroad.

The Emptiness of the Cup, Part 2
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>> Windows Media File (25 mb)

Objects in the world have to be projections of wholes on the basis of parts. But that process of projection can’t exist the way it seems to either – we would never finish projecting even one cup. Projections themselves are projections! Wisdom starts with the sense that “something’s fishy here,” for ignorance depends on a false sense of certainty that things exist the way they seem.

This videocast is taken from classes taught in Los Angeles in the spring of 2008.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

The Emptiness of the Cup, Part 1
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>> Windows Media File (27 mb)

The world can be divided into subjects, objects, and the relationship between them. None of them has any self-existence; they are all empty. If objects like a cup existed the way they seemed to, they would be “out there,” on their own, with some kind of self-nature. If the cups existed like this, it would have to be singular or plural, one or many. If it were one thing, how could we see parts in the cup? And if it were many things, how could it be one cup? The cup actually can’t be “out there” at all!

This videocast is taken from classes taught in Los Angeles in the spring of 2008.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

Overcoming the Blockage of Pride
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>> Windows Media File (31 mb)

One of the most powerful motivations to overcome our pride and take ourselves to a spiritual teacher is when we have a personal disaster, when it becomes clear that life is indeed suffering and that we actually need help.  There is no refuge or protection from the realities of life other than a spiritual life, and this usually becomes clear only when the rug is pulled out from underneath us.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the spring of 2008.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

Waking Up To Reality
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>> Windows Media File (36 mb)

Most modern people aren’t actually interested in what is real; we’re too busy with our entertainment and games. We’re addicted to our own unhappiness and ignorance and resist the very things that would overthrow them. To counter these tendencies we must train our minds and use our reasoning. If we do so, we will realize that everything is changeable and real happiness is potentially in our grasp.

This videocast is taken from classes taught in Los Angeles in the spring of 2008.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

Recognizing Suffering in Order to Be Happy
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>> Windows Media File (42 mb)

Our experience of the world is only an interpretation, but why do I interpret the world the way I do?  Interpretations are forced upon us by karma, by how we’ve treated others in the past, and because we have been selfish instead of compassionate we continue to suffer.  Recognizing the suffering in our own lives is the precondition for compassion for others, but generally we are ignoring the truth of suffering and therefore can’t even begin a serious quest for the alternative.

This videocast is taken from classes taught in Los Angeles in the spring of 2008

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

Is There Anything Good About Suffering?
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>> Windows Media File (30 mb)

Are there any advantages to suffering? All experiences – bad and good – that have happened to us in the past were necessary to makes us the people we are now. We can begin to have a healthier attitude toward past and present suffering by cultivating acceptance, patience, and compassion for others.

This videocast is taken from a teaching given at the Bodhi Tree Bookstore, Los Angeles, in December of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Resuscitating the God We Have Killed
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>> Windows Media File (27 mb)

We are living in a radically secular time and place, where nothing is special. Within a world where nothing is sacred, we must rediscover the possibility of the miraculous, especially in the form of our teachers. But we can only see what we have the goodness to see. A spiritual practice includes creating the karma that allows us to see that the sacred is potentially all around us all the time.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the spring of 2008.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Pride in Intelligence
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>> Windows Media File (32 mb)

While our intellect is a great gift, we must be careful to avoid pride in our intelligence which, like our money or good looks, we will inevitably lose sooner or later. Pride blocks us from learning in general, and in our spiritual life it is one of the worst of the mental afflictions and prevents us from making any progress.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the spring of 2008.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

Freedom From Karma
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>> Windows Media File (32 mb)

Can we ever be freed from karma? In Eastern texts, “freedom” often means freedom from the illusion of a concrete entity we call “ourselves.” Karma is stored in our present conceptualisation of ourselves. If we could learn how to change our understanding of ourselves, we could completely change our whole karmic record. But we have to create the karma to have the possibility to totally recreate our karma!

This videocast is taken from a course taught for Diamond Mountain University in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Committing Karmic Suicide
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>> Windows Media File (17 mb)

When we don’t have enough karma to get what we want without depriving others, we should commit “karmic suicide.” Instead of pushing the karmic envelope, let it ride; let others go first or have what you wanted. Sacrificing what you want creates the karma to have an abundance of it in the future.

This videocast is taken from a course taught for Diamond Mountain University in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Being in the World But Not of It
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>> Windows Media File (34 mb)

The Bhagavad Gita teaches us how to act properly in a messy, imperfect world. First and foremost, we must understand the real principles of causality – which is one element of what the Gita calls “karma yoga.” Everything is in the nexus of causality and change. There are no “things” in the world. Everything is just movement or process; everything is coming from karma.

This videocast is taken from a course taught for Diamond Mountain University in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Smackdown With Anger
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>> Windows Media File (37 mb)

It is possible to eradicate anger entirely. But it’s not easy. We need to have a “smackdown with anger” to overcome it. Lama Marut here tells us how to do this in three steps: 1) at first, you’ll need to just “run away,” that is, get yourself out of the situation if you can’t restrain yourself from retaliating; 2) when you get stronger and are ready, when the provocation starts you just take it without responding to anger with anger; 3) after practicing for a long time, instead of getting angry when someone is angry with you, you love them and feel compassion towards them.

This videocast is taken from a public talk given at the Bodhi Tree Bookstore in Los Angeles in December of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

The Ten Commandments of Karma Yoga
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>> Windows Media File (46 mb)

At the very foundation of what the Bhagavad Gita calls “karma yoga” is understanding the grossest level of karmic management: don’t kill, don’t steal, don’t commit adultery, etc. We must become masters of morality; we can’t practice more advanced forms of a spiritual life until we are firmly grounded in the basics. We must “yogify our karma”: restrain ourselves from hurting other beings and cleanse the bad karma we have already committed.

This videocast is taken from a course taught for Diamond Mountain University in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Finding Your Teacher
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>> Windows Media File (40 mb)

What qualities should you look for in a spiritual teacher? Lama Marut reviews the list: You should have a strong attraction to them and they should be happy (since that’s what you want them to teach you!). They should be ethical, good at meditation, and intellectually know the nature of reality. Their spiritual qualities should exceed yours, they should be happily working hard to teach you, and they should know the spiritual texts that they are teaching. They should have a deep realization of ultimate reality, be a master instructor, teach because they love you, and not get discouraged and give up on you.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course on the Bhagavad Gita taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the winter of 2008

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

What Forgiving Is and Isn’t
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>> Windows Media File (28 mb)

We cannot be happy while carrying grudges and resentments about what others have done to us in the past. We must forgive them – unilaterally and pre-emptively. In order to do this, we have to understand what forgiveness is and isn’t. It isn’t just forgetting, it isn’t about whether the offender deserves it or has apologized, it isn’t an act of weakness or capitulation, and it isn’t for their sake. Forgiveness is for us; it is in our own self-interest, for without it we’ll never be happy.

This videocast is taken from a public talk given at the Bodhi Tree Bookstore in Los Angeles in December of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Reaching Ecstasy
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>> Windows Media File (40 mb)

Many people in the Western world seem to have forgotten that true goal of every spiritual tradition is the highest happiness – bliss or ecstasy. Every authentic spiritual path leads to this goal, and on the way to that goal the practitioner should be getting happier and happier. Non-spiritual paths like consumer capitalism do not bring happiness, and the proof of that is that we all got everything the materialistic worldview promised. Instead of happiness, our prosperity just brought more depression.

This videocast is taken from a series of teachings given at Rockport, Massachusetts, in January of 2008.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Is it a Pen or a Chew Toy?
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>> Windows Media File (37 mb)

Reality can be divided into how things appear and how things really are. Things exist “deceptively” in that they appear differently from how they really are. It seems that things are “out there,” independently and objectively. But actually they are “empty.” Things do exist, but only as projections coming from us due to how we’ve treated others in the past. Humans see a cylinder as pen while a dog might see it as a chew toy due to different karma. Because things are ultimately empty of self-nature, everything is perfectible.

This videocast is taken from a course taught for Diamond Mountain University in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

What is the Real Secret?
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>> Windows Media File (45 mb)

The real secret to obtaining true happiness is not just wanting it. We have to create the causes for it. Being happy is not a trivial goal. It is the precondition to being able to be compassionate toward others. And the only way to be happy is to worry about someone else’s happiness, and not obsess all the time about our own selfish desires.

This videocast is taken from a public talk at the Bodhi Tree Bookstore in Los Angeles in December of 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

Taking Advantage of Your Miraculous Life
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>> Windows Media File (43 mb)

We are living miraculous lives, but what are we doing with them? We are mostly taking them for granted instead of taking full advantage of our amazing opportunity. We have are living the lives that millions of traditional practitioners have prayed for, and should not just sleep walk through it.

This videocast is taken from a series of teachings given at Rockport, Massachusetts, in January, 2007.

Write to us at: podcast@aci-la.org

 

The Religious Teacher: Part 2
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>> Windows Media File (25 mb)

Can we prove that our spiritual teacher or guru is an Enlightened Being?  Do we really know for sure, somehow, that our teacher is not a Buddha?  Our preconceptions about what an Enlightened Being should look like prevent us from seeing our teacher for who he or she really is.  The process of “guru yoga” is learning to be the teacher.  If you see the teacher as perfect, you will become that.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course on the Bhagavad Gita taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the winter of 2008

The Religious Teacher: Part 1
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>> Windows Media File (30 mb)

God can be understood to be a transcendent figure, outside of us, or as very close, right here in our lives. In the Bhagavad Gita, God is presented as Krishna, the guru and close friend of His devotee, Arjuna. We too can have an intimate relationship with the divine in the form of our religious teacher, but we must first must recognize the guru as our personal portal to the sacred and surrender ourselves to Him or Her.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course on the Bhagavad Gita taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the winter of 2008.

The Laws of Karma: Part 2
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>> Windows Media File (18 mb)

Lama Marut discusses the three worldviews we use to explain how and why things happen to us in life. #1. Things happen for no reason. #2. God is micromanaging the Universe. Or #3. Everything is in the web of causality. We conveniently mix and match these worldviews to explain our circumstances, but a true believer of worldview #3 takes responsibility for everything that is happening in their world.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course on the Bhagavad Gita taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

The Laws of Karma: Part 1
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>> Windows Media File (35 mb)

The Bhagavad Gita states, “No action in this world goes for naught, or brings about a contrary result.” Actions of selflessness and altruism toward others can bring nothing other than goodness to you, and actions of selfishness and harm to others can bring nothing other than harm. Although these laws do not always seem evident, if we fail to assume the basic principles of karma our whole moral code begins to crumble.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course on the Bhagavad Gita taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

 

Obstacles To Working Hard For Happiness: Part 2
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>> Windows Media File (34 mb)

Lama Marut continues the delineation of the main obstacles to working hard, happily, for real and lasting happiness.  “Attraction to things that are bad” or bad habits means, among other things, watching TV instead of spending time more profitably.   And feeling discouraged, low self-esteem, or depression – which has increased in proportion to our own affluence and is due to thinking about ourselves all the time – is another major obstacle to our spiritual progress.

This videocast is taken from a Tibetan Heart Yoga Teacher Training course held in Tucson, Arizona, in September of 2007.

The Gita’s Three Yogas and Buddhism
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>> Windows Media File (41 mb)

The Bhagavad Gita is linked to the early texts of the Indian Mahayana Buddhist traditions by its emphasis on the three “yogas” of devotion, compassionate action, wisdom, and devotion or bhakti. In Buddhism, the pan-Indian devotional movement found expression not only in the notion also found in Hinduism that the divine is imminent, familiar, and appears all around us, but also in the figure of the bodhisattva whose compassion for other beings is so overwhelming that he or she would do practically anything to get enlightened in order to help them.  “Karma yoga” in the Gita means selfless action, action done without regard to “what’s in it for me,” reverberating with the Buddhist emphasis on compassion and loving-kindness.  And the “yoga of wisdom” teaches us that there is a reality beyond that of mere appearances, a concept found in many, if not all, of the world’s religions.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course on the Bhagavad Gita taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

The Three Spiritual Practices
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>> Windows Media File (41 mb)

In the Bhagavad Gita, one of the classic texts in the history of religions, Lord Krishna teaches us three different but interrelated spiritual practices: the discipline of one’s actions (karma yoga), of wisdom (jnyana yoga), and of devotion (bhakti yoga). In this brief introduction to the text, Lama Marut reviews what each of these “yogas” entail and how we can begin to develop them in our own lives.

This videocast is taken from a Diamond Mountain University course on the Bhagavad Gita taught in Tucson, Arizona, in the fall of 2007.

Obstacles To Working Hard For Happiness, Part 1
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>> Windows Media File

Why aren’t we doing the things in life we know are the most important?  What’s preventing us from developing the “joyful effort” we need to progress in our spiritual lives?  The main obstacle to working hard, happily, for real and lasting happiness is laziness.  Laziness can mean “just not feeling like it” – always procrastinating and putting off what we know we should do.  But laziness can also involve keeping so busy with unimportant things that we don’t have the time and energy to dedicate to our spiritual lives.  We must learn to “get unbusy” with things that don’t really matter in order to joyfully work hard for the things that do. 

This videocast is taken from a Tibetan Heart Yoga Teacher Training course held in Tucson, Arizona, in September of 2007.

 

Running with Scissors
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>> Windows Media File (25mb)

We can’t achieve the happiness we all are seeking if we continue to create the causes for suffering.  We have to let go of the scissors with which we are cutting ourselves; we have to renounce the idea that our happiness (or unhappiness) comes from any place other than ourselves.  No one can make us happy, and no one can make us unhappy.  Our problems derive from our true and only enemies, the three main “mental afflictions” of desire, aversion and the ignorance  that underlies them. 

This videocast is taken from a Tibetan Heart Yoga Teacher Training course held in Tucson, Arizona, in September of 2007.

 

Learning to be Happy Part 2
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>> Windows Media File (16mb)

“Problems” do not objectively exist.  They are just interpretations of events.  In order to be happy we have to learn how to concentrate on the many good things in life, realize that happiness can not come from outside of us but only from within, and learn to live contentedly in the present.

This videocast is taken from a teaching given at a public talk in Los Angeles, California, on December 11, 2006.

 

Learning to be Happy Part 1
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>> Windows Media File (8mb)

In this inaugural videocast, Lama Marut points out that our deepest desire, the only motivator of everything we do, is to be happy.  But we often mistake true happiness for something ephemeral and superficial.  True happiness cannot be found in money, relationships, professional advancement, or vacations to exotic places.  It must be found within and must be cultivated through an authentic spiritual practice.

This videocast is taken from a teaching given at a public talk in Los Angeles, California, on December 11, 2006.

 

OTHER VIDEOS

Lama Marut teaching in Cape Ann:
Photo slide show by Barbara Simundza

>> Click here to download the WMV (Windows Media File)

>> Click here to watch the Quick TIme

 

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TV interview in Sacramento

 

>> Click here to watch Venerable Marut on "SAC & CO"
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Explorations in Emptiness

Watch Venerable Marut's latest teachings in New York: "Explorations into Emptiness" is a fascinating talk based on the writings of Arya Nagarjuna.

>> The Heart of Emptiness: Part 1
>> The Heart of Emptiness: Part 2

>> Watch the video (takes you to GoogleVideo)


Watch Lama Marut on The Standard, a Canadian current affairs program that covers national and international issues through the lens of faith.

The Standard interview: Part 1 (7min 15sec)

>> PC: Windows Media File  |  >> MAC: MPEG-1

The Standard interview: Part 2 (6min 45sec)

>> PC: Windows Media File  |  >> MAC: MPEG-1

The Standard interview: Part 3 (5min 30sec)

>> PC: Windows Media File  |  >> MAC: MPEG-1

Lama Marut on 'The Standard'

This video is in Windows Media (.wmv) or MPEG-1 (.mpg) format.

*  For viewing on a PC, please >> go here to download Windows  Media Player (free). 

*  MAC users can >> go here to download the Quicktime Player (free).


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