ACI LA
   
SEPTEMBER 2008


ACI LA Newsletter

   

ummer at the Mahasukha Center was blissfully filled with many richly diverse teachings and a few memorable firsts for ACI-LA. In June four students took their maroke, a final ceremony drawn from the traditional Tibetan monastic education system, marking the completion of the eighteen ACI courses. Lama Marut presided over a beautiful ceremony with a room full of supportive friends.

Not long afterwards, four students took vows for the first time with Lama Cliff, a joyous ceremony witnessed by friends and family. We hope these are the first of many such ceremonies to take place in the future at Mahasukha.

Have you ever wondered -- "What act that I did in the past created the causes for me to have this present experience?" And "how do I continue to have this experience (or prevent it from happening again)?" To answer these and similar questions we are happy to announce that the long awaited, new and improved version of Ask Mr. Karma is back and running on the ACI-LA website. Just click on the website below and check it out.

/mg-askmrkarma.html

The Mahasukha Center has a full schedule of classes lined up for fall.

All of these are listed at the END of this newsletter, as well as on the ACI-LA website (www.aci-la.org) with a full calendar of events for the months to come.

Our efforts to raise money for a Three Year Retreat, scheduled to begin in October of 2010, are continuing. Click the following link to see the full description. / and go to the bottom where it says How Can I Help? Then click on Great Retreat.

As you probably know, we've partnered with an internet service called Café Press and will be selling distinctive items, imprinted with Lama Marut-isms and other quotes. Click the link below to Café Press store website, to see all the items available and, have the chance to bring a smile, or a challenging thought, to those around you. A percentage of every one of these items will go directly into the retreat fund: http://www.cafepress.com/lamamarut

The Asian Classics Institute of Los Angeles is dedicated to the serious study and personal practice of the original teachings of the Buddha, and for those wanting to learn more about this tradition. It offers a wide range of courses, guided meditations and other activities, all offered on a donation basis, including Introductory, Dharma Essentials and Formal Study courses focusing on Tibetan Buddhist philosophy and practice.

We hope this month's newsletter supports your spiritual practice and provides you with the resources you need to be truly happy and make the most of your precious human life.


   
  This Month
  A Message from Brian (Venerable Marut)
  Contributions
  Dharma Book of the Month
  Dharma Flicks
  Dharma Website of the Month
  Dharma Podcasts: Recent Audio Uploads
  Upcoming ACI-LA Classes
  How You Can Help
  Thank You
  ACI LA Home
   

 

ACI LA Newsletter

   
 

A Message From Brian (Venerable Marut)

   
 

"Which Side Are You On When You're Nobody?"

Are you are Republican or Democrat?   A Progressive or Conservative?   Are you for Obama or McCain?

We're now coming down to the wire in the presidential election and undoubtedly, the feverish rhetoric and excitement will be increasing. So too will increase the negativity, the demonization of the other side, the depersonalization and denigration of the opposing candidate and his supporters (and often his family) -- the whole ugly ball of wax of anger, resentment, and self-righteousness that seems so often to accompany politics.

Is there anything good in this? Groucho Marx once pessimistically quipped, "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedies."  

For us, the question is this: Is it possible to be both politically engaged and true to one's spiritual principles? Is it possible to be involved in politics without the schismatic divisiveness that just alienates us further from one another?

I spent most of this past summer in personal retreat where I meditated daily on the topic of "no self" or anatman. As is often the case with emptiness meditations, the structure of analysis is deceptively simple. The meditation here is to, first of all, get in touch with the self you normally think you are - a unitary, unchanging, and independent "watcher" and "controller" of your life. The second step is to say: If there were a self like that, it would have to either be identical to the parts of the self or different from them. One or the other. Only two choices. If there were an "I" like the one I ordinarily think there is, it would have to findable somewhere within the body and mind that make up the parts of such a "me," or it would have to exists apart from this mind-body complex. Same as or different from.

And then the fun begins. Back and forth, you do this tennis match between two impossible alternatives. "I think I must be somewhere within my body and mind," and then you start looking for "you" there. But how can the you you're trying to find - the unitary, unchanging, and independent "you" - be the same as (which means "identical to," "one with" and also "indistinguishable from") the multiple, ever-changing, and interdependent conglomerate of physical and mental parts? So over to the other side. "I" must be different from my parts." But how can that "I" am looking for exist separate from its parts? Who would I be without my body and mind?  

The point, of course, is that by bouncing between these two untenable choices, one will come to the realization that the "I" we're looking for - the self we so deeply believe exists and that we so cherish and cling to - isn't really there at all.   The self exists only as a mere imputation.   It's just a label or concept.   What we call the "self" isn't an entity or thing. It's empty of being that. It's only a name we give to a constantly changing process.   Without the name, there ain't nothing there.

I can't say I really made much progress doing this meditation over and over again all summer. The belief in the self is very deeply entrenched and desperately resists eradication. What I did discover is how much the self wants to avoid its own demise.   The self hides from the illuminating light of reason. It has a rather well-developed survival instinct. It does not want to be exposed as the phantom it is.

And so it takes on many guises. Like a parasite or vampire, it derives its very being by latching onto other things. It sometimes masquerades as the body: "I am a man.   I am fifty-six years old. I am Caucasian. I am right-handed." Other times it poses as one or another of the mental functions:   "I am happy, depressed, upset, or elated."   Or "I am my memories. I am a victim and creation of my past." Or "I am the seer of sights, hearer of sounds, feeler, taster, toucher." "I am the listener to my thoughts."   (And if you're the listener, then who is it doing the talking?)

So which one is it? Who are you? The imaginary self is constantly having an identity crisis!   It doesn't know who it is (because it isn't anyone) and so it adopts all these various roles at various times and says, for that moment at least, "This is who I am."   The self is constantly impersonating a self!

Our whole lives are spent with the self desperately trying to be someone. "I am a son, brother, father." "I am a lawyer, painter, insurance salesman." "I am a surfer, a wine connoisseur, a traveler." "I am a Buddhist, Hindu, Christian, Jew, or Muslim."   These roles and labels give us a sense of being somebody. They are the disguises of a non-existent self.  

Perhaps some of us are drawn to politics because it, too, gives us a chance to be somebody: "I am a Democrat, Republican, Independent," etc. And like other identities the chimerical self assumes, a partisan political persona pits itself against other identities.   . . whom it definitely is not. If I am a Democrat I'm also, by definition, not a Republican.

Splitting ourselves off from our fellow human beings is not a Buddhist practice.   Both of the two "wings" of our training - compassion and wisdom - are in fact designed to do just the opposite: to break down the walls of separation we've erected vis-à-vis others.   Compassion does this through recognizing that we're all in the same boat, suffering here in samsara. Wisdom does it by dispelling the illusion of a discrete, concrete self.

So let's return to the question: Can we be practicing our compassion and wisdom and still be politically involved? I think it is very hard. It is very tempting, once we've entered the political sphere, to engage in the exactly the kind of divisive, alienating thought and action we are trying to overcome with our spiritual discipline.  

To be a Buddhist does not require us to be apolitical either. It is not a Buddhist ideal to sit idly while what we see as injustices are perpetrated, or to live in a country that is waging war against others without objecting. It was Mahatma Gandhi's belief that "Those who think religion and politics are separate understand neither."

So how to walk the political tightrope without falling into the abyss of anger towards and estrangement from those we oppose? With Gandhi and a very few others we are presented with paragons of how to be politically engaged while maintaining our spiritual principles. The same secret for the harmonization of these apparently contradictory enterprises was taught by all of them.

The secret is to love your "enemy," your political "opponent." The secret is to realize that those you disagree with are not, fundamentally, different from you.

Jesus said: "You have heard the law that says, 'Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.' But I say, love your enemies! Pray for those who persecute you! ... .If you love only those who love you, what reward is there for that? ... If you are kind only to your friends, how are you different from anyone else?" (Matthew 5:43-47 )

Loving those whom you oppose was also the key to the nonviolent resistance perfected Gandhi-ji. "It is easy enough to be friendly to one's friends," said the Mahatma. "But to befriend the one who regards himself as your enemy is the quintessence of true religion. The other is mere business." The means and ends must conform.   You can't get peace through war, a harmonious society by fostering enmity towards those you disagree with. "The pursuit of truth does not permit violence on one's opponent," insisted Gandhi, and this very much includes the violence of thought and speech we are tempted to indulge in when we enter the political realm.

Following the examples of both Jesus and Gandhi, Martin Luther King affords another of the rare examples of political leaders who did not lose sight of the fundamentals of a spiritual life. He echoes the same sentiment: "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that."

Finally, the Dalai Lama has consistently given us a contemporary example of how to stand up against injustice while not abandoning one's spiritual ideals in the process.   The key for the Dalai Lama has also been to generate love and compassion even for -- no, especially for -- one's persecutors and political opponents. "Genuine compassion," His Holiness teaches,

is based on the rationale that all human beings have an innate desire to be happy and overcome suffering, just like myself. And, just like myself, they have the natural right to fulfill this fundamental aspiration. On the basis of the recognition of this equality and commonality, you develop a sense of affinity and closeness with others.   With this as a foundation, you can feel compassion regardless of whether you view the other person as a friend or an enemy. It is based on the other's fundamental rights rather than your own mental projection.

So as the election nears, if you think you can involve yourself in politics in the same manner as Jesus, Gandhi, King, and the Dalai Lama, then by all means "be political."   The "you" then, of course, will not think it is affiliated with one side versus another but, rather, will be identified with all sides, with all beings.  

And if "you" cannot identify with and love your political opponents, it is probably better to not make matters worse by mucking around in an arena "you" are not ready to enter. It is better to be apolitical in order to safeguard one's spiritual practice than to abandon that practice in order to indulge oneself in political partisanship.

With all good wishes,

Marut

menu

 
   

 

ACI LA Newsletter

   
  ontributions
   
 

You open the door in the morning and go on to the street; there are beautiful flowers everywhere. The air is crisp and the temperature is exactly right. As You walk You don't really touch the floor. You move swiftly floating on air, and the ground is made of lapis lazuli. There is a sweet smell in the air. It's the most wonderful perfume You've encountered, and every breath of it fills You with joy. Everybody around You is so happy they can't stop laughing and smiling! This is so contagious it fills Your whole body, it's like if every cell vibrates with happiness. As You walk by all these beings of unsurpassed beauty wave at You, and from each one of their hearts comes out a beam with an angel that presents offerings in an instant. You enjoy all these for a short time, and a long time. There's really no time. And immediately You offer things back to them. You know they have been Your Teacher since beginningless time. They have come as co-workers, mothers, husbands and children. And they have brought You to this place sweetly, secretly. You keep them dearly in Your heart, where again light rays are sent forth to each one of them, and in an instant You recall all those days of study You had together in Los Angeles , at the Seat of Great Joy; the coffees and the cookies you shared. You understand the reasons, and you see directly everything You know is coming from you: as you hold the Sword of Wisdom, the MP3 player that plays only dharma and holds all words, and the e-book that teaches just the right thing, you immediately give it to all those who still need it. You make sure to give to each being everything they need to come join you.    Today is one of many endless moments of bliss.

Welcome to Your pure land. It all starts here, now.

Irma Gomés

   
 

Yama Ahinsa: Non-Harming
This is the third article in an ongoing series by Rene Miranda

Words sometimes have a whole story behind their meaning. The word yama means self-control. It comes from the Sanskrit root yam, meaning "to reach for something."   Yama with the accent on the first syllable came to mean the reins of a horse, which you reach for to control the horse. Then it came to mean a word for controlling or restraining the self. Then, because there are two reins, it came to mean things in pairs, like twins, when the accent is on the second syllable. In English the word Gemini came from this word. It is also the root meaning for Yama, the Lord of Death whose twin sister was Yami. In mythology Yama dies and Yami mourns for him greatly. To help her, the gods create night for her, as a time for her to forget her sorrow. We see the dichotomy here as well in night and day, moon and sun.  

Yama is the sine qua non of the eight limbs of yoga. Until one has enough compassion to practice careful and intentional restraint from negative deeds, a successful yoga practice is not possible. Why? For one, the karmic cause of having a healthy body is taking care of the bodies of others. Secondly, meditative concentration is only possible when one has a clear conscience. Just try to meditate for about 30 seconds and notice what kinds of thoughts come up in an untrained mind. Perhaps thoughts like: "Wow, I wish I hadn't said that" or "I need to take care of this later" come up. Or, better yet, try to meditate after having an argument with someone. The more pure the mind, the more we are making the imprints of compassion by protecting beings, the calmer the mind will be.  

The first Yama is Ahinsa or non-harming. Ahinsa means holding the belief that no injury or pain be inflicted upon any living being in any way, at any time and under any circumstance. Nonharming is the root of all the subsequent restraints as well as the observances because it is not possible to practice these without the practice of ahinsa.  

We can inflict harm on other beings through any of the three gateways of body, speech and mind. Ahinsa by body means taking great care to be sure the least amount of harm comes to any living being by our physical actions as possible.   It is impossible to live in this world without harming. We become vegetarians and still millions of small beings of the animal world die when crops are harvested.   We drive carefully, don't use the cell phone, and still millions of insects as well as other tiny creatures are crushed by the vehicle. What is most important is the willingness to take every precaution possible to best of one's current ability.  

Practice of ahinsa by speech includes speaking in ways that are not likely to cause fear or upset for those spoken to. No yelling. No harsh words that wound one emotionally. Whatever is spoken must be true and consistent with facts. Compassion is of key importance here. Always find a way to speak the truth in such a way that you will not hurt the feelings of the other person! Celebrate all the times you use speech to encourage, teach, and spread love!!!

Practice of ahinsa by thought means avoiding thoughts of animosity, ill-will, jealousy, and blaming. Afflicted thoughts like these can lead to physical violence, and, even if they do not, they leave an imprint that will surely come back as an unpleasant experience in the future. Catch yourself and turn the thought around, plant what will surely flower beautifully.  

What is the karmic result of practicing ahinsa perfectly? In Patanjali's Yoga Sutra, chapter two, verse 35 it says, "Ahinsa pratishthayam tat sannidau vaira tyagah." The translations in The Essential Yoga Sutra, by Geshe Michael Roach and Christie McNally is, "If you make it a way of life never to hurt others, then in your presence all conflict comes to an end." When only seeds of caring are planted, only caring seeds can ripen. How amazing a world with no violence would be!!!

I would like to end this piece with a quote by the man who practiced ahinsa better than anyone I can think of, M. K. Ghandi:

"Literally speaking, ahinsa means non-violence. But to me it has much higher, infinitely higher meaning. It means that you may not offend anybody; you may not harbour uncharitable thoughts, even in connection with those who you consider your enemies. To one who follows this doctrine, there are no enemies. If you express your love - Ahinsa - in such a manner that it impresses itself indelibly upon your so called enemy, he must return that love. This doctrine tells us that we may guard the honour of those under our charge by delivering our own lives into the hands of the man who would commit the sacrilege. And that requires far greater courage than delivering of blows." M.K. Gandhi.

 

menu

 
   

 


   
  Dharma Book of the Month
   
 

"The Essential Gandhi" Written by Mahatma Gandhi

"The Essential Gandhi" is an anthology of Gandhi's writings on his life, work, and   ideas. The source of these writings come from his books, newspaper columns, journals, speeches, and personal conversations. The writings are edited and grouped together chronologically and by subject matter.

Gandhi was a political and spiritual revolutionary, and his ideas were just as radical in 1900, as they are today.

These ideas and goals led to some controversial choices and actions. For example:

While living in South Africa, Gandhi led a corps of volunteer Indians, who helped treat wounded British soldiers in the Zulu War of 1906.

At the age of 37, Gandhi took celibacy vows, while still married to his wife.

At his ashram, Gandhi authorized the killing of a sick cow.

Gandhi spent 2338 days in jail.

Gandhi fasted 17 times in his life, many of them in political protest for atrocities committed by Hindus and the British government. One such fast was 21 days long.

The bulk of Gandhi's writings focus on his Satyagraha movement. This movement was focused on eliminating tyranny in the world through means of civil disobedience and non-violence. In this book, Gandhi goes into great detail on what Satyagraha means, and how its ideas can be used to overcome oppression.

What is most interesting about Gandhi and his writings are his openness and candidness. Like other saints in our history, he deals with life, with humility, and with an unconventional approach. He goes at destroying whatever ego there is, and shows us the path of a once suit wearing lawyer, with an English education, to a loin cloth monk. The transformation is epic, his writings are as shocking as any great leader, and his life is beyond time.

"When I think of my littleness and my limitations.. and of the expectations raised about me.. I become dazed for the moment but I come to myself as soon as I realize these expectations are a tribute not to me, a curious mixture of Jekyll and Hyde, but to the incarnation, however imperfect but comparatively great in me, of the two priceless qualities of truth and non-violence."

Submitted by an ACI-LA student

 

menu

 
 

 

ACI LA Newsletter

   
  Dharma Flicks
   
 

Implicit Dharma - The Message

Directed by Moustapha Akkad, The Message is an historical epic concerning the birth of the Islamic faith and the story of the prophet Mohammed -- who, in accordance with the tennets of Islam, is never seen or heard. The film begins in Mecca in the 7th century when the future prophet, Mohammed, is visited by a vision of the Angel Gabriel and is urged to cast aside the 300 idols of Kaaba and to worship Allah. The Message (originally screened in the U.S. as Mohammed, Messenger of God ) proved to be highly controversial during its production and initial release. Unfounded rumors had it that Mohammed would not only be depicted in the film, but that he was to be played by Charlton Heston or Peter O'Toole. This resulted in angry protests by Muslim extremists, until director Moustapha Akkad hired a staff of respected Islamic clerics as technical advisors. It was this attention to detail that makes The Message a fascinating portrait of the origins of one of the world's major religions.

 

Explicit Dharma - Recalling a Buddha: Memories of HH Karmapa XVI

Written and directed by Gregg Eller, Recalling a Buddha: Memories of HH Karmapa XVI, tells the life story of His Holiness Karmapa XVI. The film is compellingly comprised of stories from the generation of teachers that he trained, and many others that he touched. The film looks closely at HH Karmapa XVI's very special qualities and frames them amidst historical events and the cultural context of Buddhism's migration to the West.

Dharma Flicks submitted by Mike Parry

 

menu

 
   

 

ACI LA Newsletter

   
  Dharma Website of the Month
   
 

Tibetan Aid Project

For over 35 years this organization has dedicated its efforts to restoring and preserving the knowledge, compassion, and beauty of Tibet's cultural and spiritual heritage - and all humanity. The project is a bridge between donors in the west and the Tibetan people. Check out this wonderful website if you have a chance.

http://www.tibetanaidproject.org/

If you come across a site that you'd like others to know about, please notify Catherine and contribute to this part of the newsletter.

 

menu

 
   

 

   
  Dharma Podcasts: Recent Audio Uploads
   
 

Dharma Podcasts: Recent Audio Uploads

Dharma podcasts are becoming an increasingly popular and convenient way to get exposure to enlightening Dharma teachings at the touch of a computer key. Don't miss Lama Marut's weekly podcasts at www.aci-la.org .

This Month's Dharma Podcasts:

The subjects of this months podcasts might sound familiar to us but Lama Marut's unique presentation will offer enlightening and fresh perspectives. The topics are:

"They Know Not What They Do", "The Truth Shall Set You Free", "The Kingdom of Heaven Comes Gradually" and "Be Perfect, as Your Father in Heaven is Perfect."

Be sure to subscribe to keep up to date on the digital downloads! Click on the subscription button at www.aci-la.org and/or www.lamamarut.org and enter your email address to receive podcast updates. You'll receive an email announcement when new podcasts of teachings are uploaded to either site.

If you enjoy having access to these wonderful Dharma podcasts, please make sure to comment in the comments section on iTunes.

To subscribe to Lama Marut's video podcasts please go to: /mg-video.html

Click Here for Recent Audio Uploads

 
   

 

ACI LA Newsletter

   
 

Current and Upcoming ACI-LA Classes

ACI classes are donation-based and open to the public.
(Please see the calendar for full descriptions.)

   
 

ACI classes are DONATION based

Sept 2nd, 2008 (Tue) 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Guided Meditation with Rick Blue
Teacher: Rick Blue
Date: Tuesday nights
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by donation; open to the public
Contact: rick.blue@aci-la.org or call 310-454-6168

Sept 3rd, 2008 (Wed) 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Worldview Yoga with Claire and Taisha
Teacher: Claire and Taisha
Date:   Wednesday nights
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: $12 or class. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 6th, 2008 (Sat) 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Worldview Yoga - teaching teams alternate
Teacher: Alina Lobkina and Robin Ruth or Sarah Canfield and Claire Thompson
Date: Summer schedule Saturday mornings
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: $12 or class. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 7, 2008 (Sun) 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Coffee, Donuts & Buddhist Debate with ACI-LA Senior Teachers
Teacher: ACI-LA Senior Teachers
Date: ongoing - every other Sunday morning
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by donation; open to the public
Contact: info@aci-la.org

Sept 8th, 2008 (Mon)
Worldview Yoga with Mira Kingsley
Teacher: Mira Kingsley
Date: Summer Schedule: Monday nights
Time: 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Free and open to the public; donation only
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 8th, 2008 (Mon)
ACI Formal Study Course 3: Applied Meditation with Cliff Spencer
Teacher: Cliff Spencer
Date: Monday nights beginning Sept 1st
Time: 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by donation. Open to the public
Contact: Cliff.spencer@aci-la.org

Sept 9th, 2008 (Tues) 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Guided Meditation with Rick Blue
Teacher: Rick Blue
Date: Tuesday nights
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by Donations. Open to the Public
Contact: info@aci-la.org or call 310 454-6168

Sept 10th, 2008 (Wed) 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Worldview Yoga with Claire and Taisha
Teacher: Claire and Taisha
Date:   Wednesday nights
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: $12 or class. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.
Contact:   Claire Thompson

Sept 13th, 2008 (Sat) 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Worldview Yoga - teaching teams alternate
Teacher: Alina Lobkina and Robin Ruth or Sarah Canfield and Claire Thompson
Date: Summer schedule Saturday mornings
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: $12 or class. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 13th, 2008 (Sat) 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Potluck Dinner and Dharma Flick with Rick Blue
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Bring potluck
Contact: rick.blue@aci-la.org

Sept 15th, 2008 (Mon)
Worldview Yoga with Jessica Larson and Ersellia Ferron
Teacher: Jessica Larson and Ersellia Ferron
Date: Monday nights
Time: 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by donation. Open to the public
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 15th, 2008 (Mon)
ACI Formal Study Course 3: Applied Meditation with Cliff Spencer
Teacher: Cliff Spencer
Date: Monday nights beginning Sept 1st
Time: 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission:Supported by donation. Open to the public
Contact: Cliff.spencer@aci-la.org

Sept 16th, 2008 (Tues) 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Guided Meditation with Rick Blue
Teacher: Rick Blue
Date: Tuesday nights
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by Donations. Open to the Public
Contact: info@aci-la.org or call 310 454-6168

Sept 17th, 2008 (Wed)
Worldview Yoga with Claire and Taisha
Teacher: Claire and Taisha
Date:  Wednesday nights
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: $12 or class. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.
Contact: Claire Thompson 

Sept 20th, 2008 (Sat)
Worldview Yoga - teaching teams alternate
Teacher: Alina Lobkina and Robin Ruth or Sarah Canfield and Claire Thompson
Date: Summer schedule Saturday mornings
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: $12 or class. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 20th, 2008 (Sat) 7:00 PM
Informal Dharma Salon with Lauren Benjamin and ACI-LA Senior Teachers
Teacher: Lauren Benjamin
Date: Saturday, Sept 20th
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Free and open to the public; donation only
Contact: info@aci-la.org

Sept 21st, 2008 (Sun) 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Coffee, Donuts & Buddhist Debate with ACI-LA Senior Teachers
Teacher: ACI-LA Senior Teachers
Date: ongoing every other Sunday morning
Time: 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by Donations. Open to the Public
Contact: info@aci-la.org 

Sept 22, 2008 (Mon) 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Worldview Yoga with Jessica Larson and Ersellia Ferron
Teacher: Jessica Larson and Ersellia Ferron
Date: Monday nights
Time: 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by donation. Open to the public
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 22nd, 2008 (Mon)    
ACI Formal Study Course 3: Applied Meditation with Cliff Spencer
Teacher: Cliff Spencer
Date: Monday nights beginning Sept 1st
Time: 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission:Supported by donation. Open to the public
Contact: Cliff.spencer@aci-la.org

Sept 23rd, 2008 (Tue) 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Guided Meditation with Rick Blue
Teacher: Rick Blue
Date: Tuesday nights
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by donation; open to the public
Contact: rick.blue@aci-la.org or call 310-454-6168

Sept 24th, 2008 (Wed) 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
Worldview Yoga with Mira Kingsley
Teacher: Mira Kingsley
Date: Summer Schedule: Wednesday nights
Time: 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Free and open to the public; donation only
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 27th, 2008 (Sat)
Worldview Yoga - teaching teams alternate
Teacher: Alina Lobkina and Robin Ruth or Sarah Canfield and Claire Thompson
Date: Summer schedule Saturday mornings
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: $12 for class. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 29, 2008 (Mon) 6:00 PM- 7pm PM
Worldview Yoga with Jessica Larson and Ersellia Ferron
Teacher: Jessica Larson and Ersellia Ferron
Date: Monday nights beginning Sept 1st
Time: 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by donation. Open to the public
Contact: Claire Thompson

Sept 29th, 2008 (Mon)
ACI Formal Study Course 3: Applied Meditation with Cliff Spencer
Teacher: Cliff Spencer
Date: Monday nights beginning Sept 1st
Time: 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Location: Mahasukha Center
Admission: Supported by donation. Open to the public
Contact: Cliff.spencer@aci-la.org

 

menu

 
   

 


   
 

ow You Can Help

   
 

Thank you to all of the ACI-LA volunteers who help with our various Dharma projects! We are currently looking for people who have specific skills in certain areas so please email us at lamamarut@aci-la.org if you: 

* Would like to help transcribe full length audio teachings
* Have document formatting / layout skills to help format our Dharma Essentials handouts
* If you have some time to look through aci-la.org and find broken weblinks and audio that doesn't download.

 

menu

 
   

ACI LA Newsletter
   
 

Thank You

   
 

Thank you to Venerable Marut for his kindness in coming to teach the Dharma here in Los Angeles and around the world. Thank you to Lauren Benjamin, Cliff Spencer, Rick Blue, Lindsay Crouse, Catherine Eaton, Summer Moore, and Stephane Dreyfus for their kindness in continuing to teach here in Los Angeles. Thank you to Shannon Clements Parry for producing the past issues of the newsletter.

Thank you to Stephane Dreyfus for maintaining the ACI-LA website.

All suggestions and updates for the website can be sent to Stephane. Catherine Eaton produces the newsletters and would joyfully appreciate submissions. Please email your contributions to Catherine by the 20th of the month.

 

menu